theatlantic:

The State of American Beer

What’s going on in Beer World? Beer lovers of America might be forgiven if their grasp of the current brew-scape feels iffy. Alice herself would be at home in this Wonderland. It’s a world in which up is down, little is big, and there’s no Blue Moon on the horizon. 
It’s a world in which old standbys are faltering (case sales of Miller High Life were down almost 10 percent in 2013 from the prior year). Mexican labels are dominant (Corona, Modelo, and Dos Equis, account for three of the top four imported beers). And a craft-beer company founded only 20 years ago is coming on strong (“Bartender, pour me a Lagunitas”).
The March 2014 issue of Beverage Industry offers us a through-the-looking-glass portrait of Beer World in the United States today. The magazine unleashed its writers on data gathered by Information Resources Inc. (IRI) of Chicago from supermarkets, drug stores, mass merchandisers, gas and convenience stores, military commissaries, and select club and dollar retail chains for the 52 weeks ending December 29, 2014. I made graphs and charts from their tabular data.
Before we delve into the particulars, let’s remember the big picture: over the past twenty years, per-capita consumption of beer in the U.S. has been declining. Derek Thompson wrote about that here last August, citing this report. But twenty years is a long lens. Let’s take a look at the state of Beer World in the last year.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

The State of American Beer

What’s going on in Beer World? Beer lovers of America might be forgiven if their grasp of the current brew-scape feels iffy. Alice herself would be at home in this Wonderland. It’s a world in which up is down, little is big, and there’s no Blue Moon on the horizon. 

It’s a world in which old standbys are faltering (case sales of Miller High Life were down almost 10 percent in 2013 from the prior year). Mexican labels are dominant (Corona, Modelo, and Dos Equis, account for three of the top four imported beers). And a craft-beer company founded only 20 years ago is coming on strong (“Bartender, pour me a Lagunitas”).

The March 2014 issue of Beverage Industry offers us a through-the-looking-glass portrait of Beer World in the United States today. The magazine unleashed its writers on data gathered by Information Resources Inc. (IRI) of Chicago from supermarkets, drug stores, mass merchandisers, gas and convenience stores, military commissaries, and select club and dollar retail chains for the 52 weeks ending December 29, 2014. I made graphs and charts from their tabular data.

Before we delve into the particulars, let’s remember the big picture: over the past twenty years, per-capita consumption of beer in the U.S. has been declining. Derek Thompson wrote about that here last August, citing this report. But twenty years is a long lens. Let’s take a look at the state of Beer World in the last year.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Namaste, DogFish Namaste. 

FuckYeahBeer!

Namaste, DogFish Namaste.

FuckYeahBeer!

tastefullyoffensive:

Spotted in Nashville. [x]


FuckYeahBeer!

tastefullyoffensive:

Spotted in Nashville. [x]

FuckYeahBeer!
poppadeen71:

it is very important to have strong beliefs….

FuckYeahBeer!

poppadeen71:

it is very important to have strong beliefs….

FuckYeahBeer!

(Source: untiltheendofitall, via richardlc)

richardlc:

beers
nexicon:

The full version

nexicon:

The full version

I love Cali-Belgie. 

FuckYeahBeer!

I love Cali-Belgie.

FuckYeahBeer!

FuckYeahBeer!

FuckYeahBeer!

FuckYeahBeer!

FuckYeahBeer!

(Source: teen-femininja, via thisisnotkristendara)

YUM!

FuckYeahBeer!

YUM!

FuckYeahBeer!

Suggestions….

on some breweries/beer bars in New Jersey I should hit up?

laboratoryequipment:

Fracking Discussed at Alcohol SummitNew York’s alcoholic beverage industry was on display at a summit this week organized by Gov. Andrew Cuomo to focus on bolstering the business. Cuomo said that New York is home to more than 600 wineries, breweries, distilleries and cideries and ranks third in the nation in wine and grape production.New York’s alcoholic beverage industry employed 85,000 people and the combination of manufacturing, agriculture, distribution and retail had an economic impact of $27 billion in 2012, according to the National Beer Wholesalers Association and New York Wine and Grape Foundation.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fracking-discussed-alcohol-summit

laboratoryequipment:

Fracking Discussed at Alcohol Summit

New York’s alcoholic beverage industry was on display at a summit this week organized by Gov. Andrew Cuomo to focus on bolstering the business. Cuomo said that New York is home to more than 600 wineries, breweries, distilleries and cideries and ranks third in the nation in wine and grape production.

New York’s alcoholic beverage industry employed 85,000 people and the combination of manufacturing, agriculture, distribution and retail had an economic impact of $27 billion in 2012, according to the National Beer Wholesalers Association and New York Wine and Grape Foundation.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fracking-discussed-alcohol-summit

…………..FuckYeahBeer!

(Source: boiledjeans, via fuckyeahdementia)

A bill that would require craft brewers to sell their suds to a beer distributor and make them buy it back to sell at their own breweries has cleared a Senate panel.
 
The measure (SB 1714) has so infuriated craft brewers and beer enthusiasts that some on Twitter have christened it with the hashtag “#growlergate.” The Community Affairs committee approved the bill Tuesday.
 
Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, was so incensed at the idea of craft brewers having to pay someone else to sell their own product that he likened it to a mobbed-up racket. Latvala has championed the microbrewery cause.
 
The requirement is similar to paying “protection to ‘Vinnie’ in New York,” he said.
 
The bill also is favored by the Big Beer lobby, which is feeling the heat from craft beer’s competition.

Yup. 

FuckYeahBeer!

Yup.

FuckYeahBeer!